School Board Progress Reports


The Indicators

Fourteen indicators have been selected to provide information about each board's progress. The selected indicators represent some of the government's education priorities including class size in the primary grades and improved literacy rates.


Grade 6 Reading EQAO Results

The Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) annually assesses the reading, writing and math skills of Ontario's Grade 6 students. EQAO is an arm's-length agency of the provincial government and provides parents, teachers and the public with accurate and reliable information about student achievement.

In 2017-18, 82 per cent of English-language students and 92 per cent of French-language students met or exceeded the provincial standard (Level 3 on the scale of 1 to 4, or grade level B) on the EQAO Grade 6 reading assessment.

Ontario's target is for 75 per cent of Grade 6 students to be meeting or exceeding the provincial standard in reading, writing and mathematics.


Progress in Grade 6 Reading EQAO Results

The Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) annually assesses the reading, writing and math skills of Ontario's Grade 6 students. EQAO is an arm's-length agency of the provincial government and provides parents, teachers and the public with accurate and reliable information about student achievement.

Between 2015-16 and 2017-18, EQAO reported that there was a 1 percentage point increase for English-language students and a 1 percentage point increase for French-language students who met or exceeded the provincial standard (Level 3 on the scale of 1 to 4, or grade level B) in the Grade 6 reading assessments.

Ontario's target is for 75 per cent of Grade 6 students to be meeting or exceeding the provincial standard in reading, writing and mathematics. In 2017-18, 82 per cent of English-language students and 92 per cent of French-language students met or exceeded the provincial standard.


Grade 10 Literacy Test

The Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) annually assesses the literacy skills of Ontario's Grade 10 students through the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test. EQAO is an arm's-length agency of the provincial government and provides parents, teachers and the public with accurate and reliable information about student achievement.

The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test assesses reading and writing skills that students are expected to have learned in all subjects by the end of Grade 9. Students have the opportunity to rewrite the test if they fail; however, they must pass the test or enrol in and pass the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course to obtain the graduation literacy requirement.

In 2017-18, the percentage of Grade 10 students who were eligible to write the test for the first time and who fully participated in and passed the literacy test was 79 per cent for English-language students and 91 per cent for French-language students.


Progress in Grade 10 Literacy Test

The Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) annually assesses the literacy skills of Ontario's Grade 10 students through the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test. EQAO is an arm's-length agency of the provincial government and provides parents, teachers and the public with accurate and reliable information about student achievement.

The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test assesses reading and writing skills that students are expected to have learned in all subjects by the end of Grade 9. Students have the opportunity to rewrite the test if they fail; however, they must pass the test or enrol in and pass the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course to obtain the graduation literacy requirement.

In 2017-18, the percentage of Grade 10 students who were eligible to write the test for the first time and who fully participated in and passed the literacy test was 79 per cent for English-language students and 91 per cent for French-language students.

Between 2015-16 and 2017-18, the percentage of Grade 10 students who were eligible to write the test for the first time and who fully participated in and passed the literacy test was a 2 percentage point decrease for English-language students and there was no change for French-language students.


Credit Accumulation by the End of Grade 10

Credits are counted if they are part of the student's transcript at the end of June. Courses taken at summer school or concluding after June 30 are counted for the following year. Students learning English as a second language or with special needs are included.

Ontario students who have 16 or more credits at the end of Grade 10 are on track to graduate with their peers.

At the end of the 2015-16 school year, 79 per cent of Grade 10 students had 16 or more credits.


Progress in Credit Accumulation by the End of Grade 10

Credits are counted if they are part of the student's transcript at the end of June. Courses taken at summer school or concluding after June 30 are counted for the following year. Students learning English as a second language or with special needs are included.

Ontario students who have 16 or more credits at the end of Grade 10 are on track to graduate with their peers.

At the end of the 2015-16 school year, 79 per cent of Grade 10 students had 16 or more credits. This is a twelve percentage point increase compared to the end of 2006-07 school year.


Credit Accumulation by the End of Grade 11

Credits are counted if they are part of the student's transcript at the end of June. Courses taken at summer school or concluding after June 30 are counted for the following year. Students learning English as a second language or with special needs are included.

Ontario students who have 23 or more credits at the end of Grade 11 are on track to graduate with their peers.

At the end of the 2015-16 school year, 82 per cent of Grade 11 students had 23 or more credits.


Progress in Credit Accumulation by the End of Grade 11

Credits are counted if they are part of the student's transcript at the end of June. Courses taken at summer school or concluding after June 30 are counted for the following year. Students learning English as a second language or with special needs are included.

Ontario students who have 23 or more credits at the end of Grade 11 are on track to graduate with their peers.

At the end of the 2015-16 school year, 82 per cent of Grade 11 students had 23 or more credits. This is a ten percentage point increase compared to the end of 2007-08 school year.


Primary Grade Classes with 20 or Fewer Students

In 2016-17, all primary classes in Ontario had 23 students or fewer and 90 per cent had 20 students or fewer. This was the eighth straight year the government has reached its primary class size targets.


Progress in Primary Grade Classes with 20 or Fewer Students

In 2016-17, all primary classes in Ontario had 23 students or fewer and 90 per cent had 20 students or fewer. This was the eighth straight year the government has reached its primary class size targets.


Four-Year Graduation Rate

A student is considered a four-year graduate if they receive an OSSD within four years of starting Grade 9.

As of August 31, 2017, 86.3 per cent of students were graduating in five years and 79.8 per cent in four years. The four-year and five-year graduation rate is calculated as the percentage of students who receive an OSSD within four or five years of starting Grade 9. Students who have transferred out of province, or died, are not included in calculating the graduation rate.
For students to earn an OSSD, they must:

  • earn a minimum of 30 credits, including 18 compulsory credits and 12 optional credits
  • meet the provincial secondary school literacy requirement, and
  • complete 40 hours of community involvement activities.


Progress in the Four-Year Graduation Rate

Provincewide, the students who graduated with an OSSD within four years of starting Grade 9 increased by 1.5 percentage points compared to 2015. A student is considered a four-year graduate if they receive an OSSD within four years of starting Grade 9.


Five-Year Graduation Rate

A student is considered a five-year graduate if they receive an OSSD within five years of starting Grade 9.

As of August 31, 2017, 86.3 per cent of students were graduating in five years and 79.8 per cent in four years. The four-year and five-year graduation rate is calculated as the percentage of students who receive an OSSD within four or five years of starting Grade 9. Students who have transferred out of province, or died, are not included in calculating the graduation rate.
For students to earn an OSSD, they must:

  • earn a minimum of 30 credits, including 18 compulsory credits and 12 optional credits
  • meet the provincial secondary school literacy requirement, and
  • complete 40 hours of community involvement activities.


Progress in the Five-Year Graduation Rate

Provincewide, the students who graduated with an OSSD within five years of starting Grade 9 increased by 0.8 percentage points compared to 2015. A student is considered a five-year graduate if they receive an OSSD within five years of starting Grade 9.